Old Lion Brewery Malthouse

Old Lion Brewery Malthouse

Industry played a major part in the historical development of the city, brewing being just one of the activities of industrial Adelaide. The Calvert engraving dated 1876 shows more than 30 industrial stacks, and the only chimney that seems to have survived is the stack at the Lion complex in North Adelaide. This complex was imaginatively adapted for use as an entertainment precinct in the early 1970s.

The demolition of industrial buildings in the city has been widespread and there are few reminders of this aspect of 19th-century Adelaide. Of the first main breweries that came into existence in 1843-44 in South Australia, only Johnston’s at Oakbank and the former Wyatt Street brewery are more or less intact. The Lion Brewery, although later, was almost as significant.

The Lion Brewery and Malthouse was built for Bailey and Stanley. Architect Daniel Garlick advertised for tenders in 1871 for the excavation of a large cellar and the erection of a brewery. In 1872, tenders for the construction of the malthouse, kiln and store were advertised.

The building is similar to one built in Clare (now the Enterprise Winery), also designed by Garlick. Glen Osmond bluestone was used in the construction by Brown and Thompson. By 1872 the brewery was described as having a cellar, 5 feet by 25 feet, with a malt store of similar dimensions above it. The malt kiln was later extended.

In 1873 Bailey sold his interest in the brewery to W.H. Beaglehole, the resulting company being operated by Beaglehole, Johnston, James and Gasquoine.

There were further alterations to the brewery in 1873 and 1875 to designs by James Cumming. In 1880 Cumming called tenders for the construction of the hotel at the corner of Jerningham and Melbourne streets. By 1883 the present the complex had largely reached its present form.

Beaglehole and Johnston continued operations until 1888, when the Lion Brewing and Malting Co. Limited was formed. From 1914 the Walkerville Co-operative Brewing Co. Limited supplied the Lion Hotel with beer and the brewing section of the Lion complex ceased production, although the production of aerated waters and cordials continued for some time.

Notes

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Significance

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Although no longer in use, the malthouse contributes significantly to the Lion Hotel as a symbol of the former industry.


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Images of Old Lion Brewery Malthouse

 
Architects
Daniel Garlick
Builders
Brown and Thompson
Building materials
Brick, Stone, Bluestone
Architectural styles
2 Victorian Period (c. 1840–c. 1890), 2.6 Filigree
Construction
1871 - 1872 

Additional Works

Alterations to design of James Cumming

Description
Construction commenced
8/4/1873
Construction completed
8/4/1875
Architecture and design features
Engineering features
 
Precinct
Lower North Adelaide
Council Ward
North
Alternative Addresses
Geo-coordinates
Town Acre
987
Planning Zone or Policy Area
Original owners
Bailey and Stanley
Original occupant
Later occupant/s
Purposes and use
Commercial, Hotel
AS2482 classification
10510 - Hotel - Motel - Inn
Public Access
Business/trading hours
 
NTSA ID
2924
State Heritage ID
13558
ACC Reference No.
DPTI Heritage No.
1380
RNE ID
1380
Certificate of Title No.
CT 5241/523 F131820 A1
NTSA file exists
No
Heritage Status
State Heritage listed
State heritage listing
State Heritage listed
Date of State heritage listing
Local heritage listing
Date of Local heritage listing
NTSA listing
NTSA classified
Date of NTSA listing
Section 23 (4) crtiteria
Risk status
 
Historic Themes
3.4 Manufacturing
3.4.5 Breweries and Drink Manufacturers
3.5 Commercial, Marketing & Retail
3.5.5 A City of Pubs
 
Australian Curriculum references
Year 5: The Australian Colonies
ACHHK097
 

References

  • ACA, Digest of Proceedings, 14 May 1883, Smith Survey 1880; Illustrated Sydney News, July 1876; MLSA, Historical photographs (Town Acre 987); Ward, M.H., Some brief records of brewing in South Australia, 1950. pp. 4, 17.

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