Green Dragon Hotel

Green Dragon Hotel

There has been a Green Dragon Hotel on this prominent site since 1858, once serving the teamsters and carriers entering the city. The Dragon Brewery, now demolished, was to the west, operating until about 1910.

The Green Dragon Hotel was built in 1858 for John Mitten as a public house of eight rooms with stables and stock yards of assessed value of £110. Mitten died soon after completing the hotel, leaving it to his nine-year-old niece, Mary Cant. Little change was made to the building’s fabric, but a weighbridge was constructed on the hotel premises around 1864. In the early 1860s the City Council passed a by-law requiring all wood, bark, hay, straw and coals coming into the city for sale to be weighed and certified by a licensed weighbridge. Hotels sited at such gateways into the city were the Stag, close to the East End Market; the Elephant and Castle, on West Terrace near the south-western entry to the city; the Princess Royal in O’Connell Street (rebuilt in 1884 as the Oxford Hotel); and the Green Dragon Hotel on South Terrace.

Plans for the first addition to the hotel were passed in 1882. A two-storey northern extension was erected in 1891 and a two-storey north-western rear extension was added in 1898, with modifications in 1908. A balcony was added in 1924 and the weighbridge removed. In 1940 a single-storey western addition and extensive upgrading was undertaken.

The building has been successfully operating as a Fasta Pasta restaurant for many years,

Despite all these additions, the hotel, with its chamfered corner form, parapet concealing the roof and paned double-hung sash windows to the first floor, retains a major proportion of the 1858 building.

Notes

show more

Significance

[edit | edit source]

The building is historically significant as a gateway into the city.


Connects with

Related places
Related people
Related organisations
Related events
Related things

See also



Images of Green Dragon Hotel

  • Green Dragon Hotel
 
Architects
Builders
Building materials
Stone, Bluestone
Architectural styles
2 Victorian Period (c. 1840–c. 1890)
Construction
1858 -  

Additional Works

2 Storey Additon to Northern Side

Description
Construction commenced
4/7/1891
Construction completed
4/7/2018

2 Storey Additon to North West Rear

Description
Construction commenced
4/7/1898
Construction completed
4/7/2018

Balcony Added

Description
Construction commenced
4/7/1924
Construction completed
4/7/2018

Western Side Single Storey Additon

Description
Construction commenced
4/7/1940
Construction completed
4/7/2018
Architecture and design features
chamfered, parapet
Engineering features
 
Precinct
South West Corner
Council Ward
South
Alternative Addresses
Geo-coordinates
Town Acre
677
Planning Zone or Policy Area
Original owners
John Mitten
Original occupant
Later occupant/s
Purposes and use
Commercial, Hotel
AS2482 classification
10510 - Hotel - Motel - Inn
Public Access
Business/trading hours
 
NTSA ID
State Heritage ID
13108
ACC Reference No.
DPTI Heritage No.
1676
RNE ID
1676
Certificate of Title No.
CT 5460/518 F181907 A255
NTSA file exists
No
Heritage Status
State Heritage listed
State heritage listing
State Heritage listed
Date of State heritage listing
Local heritage listing
Date of Local heritage listing
NTSA listing
Nil
Date of NTSA listing
Section 23 (4) crtiteria
Risk status
 
Historic Themes
3.5 Commercial, Marketing & Retail
3.5.5 A City of Pubs
 
Australian Curriculum references
Year 5: The Australian Colonies
ACHHK094
 

References

  • ACA, Assessments; Harry, B. and Associates, The Green Dragon conservation study, 1987; Hoad, J.L., Hotels and publicans in Soutb Australia 1836-1984, 1986, part 3, p. 264; Illustrated Sydney News, July 1876, etching of Adelaide, A.C. Cooke and J. Calvert; MLSA, Historical photographs (Town Acre 677); Pictorial Australian, July 1892 (supplement), etching of Adelaide by A.C. Cooke and J. Bruer; State Heritage Branch, Register objection report, 11 June 1986, item no. 6628-13108.

Further reading


External links


Something to add or share?

blog comments powered by Disqus