Christ Church School and outbuilding

Christ Church School and outbuilding

This building was associated with the first church school in North Adelaide and exemplifies the importance placed on church education by the individual religious groups, in this case, the Anglican Church.

Christ Church School opened in 1849 and played a prominent part in the educational life of North Adelaide. Before the State Education Act was passed in 1875, the school prospered, transferring to a new site opposite Christ Church in Jeffcott Street, where this school building was erected to the design of Wright and Woods. The foundation stone was laid on September 27, 1868, by Mrs Hamley (wife of the lieutenant-governor), with a bottle containing the architect’s name and that of G. Bradley, the builder, placed beneath the stone. The dimensions of the schoolroom were 60 feet by 30 feet by 25 feet.

The building, appropriately constructed in the Gothic style, was of limestone rubble with brick dressings and strings. It is similar to St Paul’s Day School in Flinders Street, also by E.J. Woods. The austere facade is relieved by the porch, the neatly constructed trefoil and polychrome brickwork over the tripartite window.

Following the passing of the Education Act and the erection of the North Adelaide Model School in Tynte Street, the school fell on hard times, being forced to close in 1877. This was only a temporary setback and in April 1878 Daniel Garlick planned additions to the school, presumably those at the rear.

By 1891 the parish school had been supplanted by a school run by J.H. Lindon, a former master of St Peter’s College who established Queen’s College. Lindon’s school moved to Barton Terrace in 1893 and the Christ Church schoolroom was restored to the parish. Christ Church School continued in these buildings until the mid-1960s, when the school closed.

The complex included a two-storey house that held classrooms on the ground floor and the headmaster's residence on the upper floor. Other classrooms, toilets and a shelter shed werebuilt in the grounds behind the original schoolroom. Rectors from Christ Church taught religious instruction and students daily attended the church throughout the life of the school.

Notes

show more

Significance

[edit | edit source]

The building and outbuildings represent the efforts of religious faiths to impart Christian beliefs as part of the educational curriculum. The building has been little altered by its subsequent use as a photographer’s studio. The interior survives, complete with honour roll and trussed roof. The main building is complementary to the streetscape Jeffcott Street.


Connects with

Related places
Related people
Related organisations
Related events
Related things

See also



Images of Christ Church School and outbuilding

 
Architects
Edmund Wright, Edward Woods
Builders
Building materials
Brick, Stone, Limestone
Architectural styles
2 Victorian Period (c. 1840–c. 1890), 2.14 Rustic Gothic
Construction
1868 -  

Additional Works

Extensions

Description
Designed by Daniel Garlick
Construction commenced
5/7/1878
Construction completed
5/7/2018
Architecture and design features
string course, trefoil, tripartite
Engineering features
 
Precinct
Upper North Adelaide
Council Ward
North
Alternative Addresses
Geo-coordinates
Town Acre
753
Planning Zone or Policy Area
Original owners
Anglican Church
Original occupant
Later occupant/s
Purposes and use
Education, School
AS2482 classification
16010 - House
Public Access
Business/trading hours
 
NTSA ID
State Heritage ID
13488
ACC Reference No.
DPTI Heritage No.
1417
RNE ID
1417
Certificate of Title No.
CT 6093/135 D89041 A1014 CT 6093/136 D89041 A1015
NTSA file exists
No
Heritage Status
State Heritage listed
State heritage listing
State Heritage listed
Date of State heritage listing
Local heritage listing
Date of Local heritage listing
NTSA listing
Nil
Date of NTSA listing
Section 23 (4) crtiteria
Risk status
 
Historic Themes
6.3 Worshipping
6.3.2 Church schools
 
Australian Curriculum references
Year 5: The Australian Colonies
ACHHK097
 

References


Further reading


External links


Something to add or share?

blog comments powered by Disqus